Olivenhain, Encinitas, 92024

Olivenhain

 

Olivenhain (pronounced Oh-LEE-ven-hine) is one of five communities in the City

of Encinitas. Today, Olivenhain stretches from San Elijo Lagoon in the south,

along both sides of Manchester Avenue and Rancho Santa Fe Road, out past

the northern reach of Lone Jack Road.

With winding two-lane roads, rail fences, and trails for horses, bicycles, and

pedestrians, Olivenhain has a rural atmosphere greatly prized by residents. The

"Dark Skies" policy, which limits outdoor lighting, allows us all an unparalleled

view of the evening sky.

In 1986, Olivenhain joined with Cardiff-by-the-Sea, Leucadia, New Encinitas,

and Old Encinitas to incorporate as the City of Encinitas. But our community

with the German name has an interesting history and heritage. Read on to

discover more about Olivenhain past and present.

Rancho Las Encinitas

By the early 1800's, California was a vast, sparsely inhabited territory of

Mexico. Andreas Antonio Ybarra made a formal request to the Mexican

government that he be awarded a land grant of the 4,431 acre rancho called

"Los Encinitos". The land grant was awarded on July 3, 1842. Ybarra

constructed an adobe house on the northeast corner of his rancho where he

and his wife lived for 18 years. In 1848, when California became part of the

United States, Ybarra filed claim with the United State board of Land

Commissions. His claim to the rancho was confirmed and accepted, but the

spelling was changed to "Las Encinitas."

In 1860, Ybarra sold his land to two San Diego merchants, J.R. Mannasse and

Marcus Schiller, for $3,000 (68¢ per acre).

Mannasse and Schiller converted the adobe ranch house into a stage coach

station which serviced the Seeley-Wright Stage Coach Line.

Today, Stage Coach Park in Carlsbad contains the remains of the walls of the

adobe home on the hill above the tennis courts. The remaining wall fragments

have been enclosed to prevent further damage by the environment or vandals.

Mannasse and Schiller encountered financial difficulties and lost the rancho to

foreclosure in 1800. The rancho was sold first to James Courier for $5,000.

Three months later, two brothers, Warren and Frank Kimball purchased the

rancho for $5,225 ($1.18 per acre).

The Kimball brothers owned vast parcels of land in National City, Chula Vista,

and Jamul. They planned to resell the rancho to a "Colony", a homogenous

group of immigrants who would purchase and settle on a large parcel of land.

The Kimball brothers advertised for four years, and in the spring of 1884,

received a response from Theodore Pinther of Denver, Colorado, who was

willing to put together a German Colony.

Colony Olivenhain

The Colony was begun May 21, 1884 with the first seven members — Theodore

Pinther, Joseph Ullrich, Louis Denk, Otto Pinther, Lina Pinther, Johann Bumann,

and Paul Glave. Each member paid an initiation fee, a membership fee, and

monthly dues. A member in good standing would be entitled to a five acre

parcel of cultivated land, a house of moderate size built on their property, and

the use of all colony-owned property such as horse teams, wagons, and fruit

processing machinery.

By June 1, membership had increased to 20 members. In accepting new

members, the colony wanted honest, hard-working people. People of any

nationality would be accepted if they could speak fluent German. Gamblers and

people of questionable character were not tolerated, nor were lawyers,

pawnbrokers, and insurance agents. The name "Olivenhain" which means olive

grove was chosen to name the colony.

In October, 1884, on a trip to San Diego to view different properties for the

Colony of Olivenhain, Theodore Pinther and Conrad Stroebel purchased Rancho

Las Encinitas with the Colony's money, but without their prior approval or

knowledge, for $66,500 ($15 per acre) plus interest.

On October 31, 1884, sixty-seven Olivenhain colonists boarded the train in

Denver and headed west. Food, water and shelter were almost nonexistent for

the newcomers. The only buildings on Rancho Las Encinitas were the adobe

buildings that Ybarra constructed and lived in years earlier. These three

buildings would now house 67 men, women and children until their homes were

built.

Hundreds of acres of brush-covered soil was cleared and plowed, and

construction of homes, roads, and the colony-owned farm began. The official

land distribution began in January, 1885. After a number of parcels had been

distributed, housing construction began.

The standard Colony house was either 16' x 24' or 14' x 28' divided into two or

three rooms. If the colonist wanted a larger house, additional money was paid

to the colony. Besides the standard house, there was also the economy model,

the shanty. The cost of a shanty was considerably less than the standard house

and credit allowances were given to those colonists that requested them.

Shanties were also built for colonists who had not yet paid enough money into

the colony and thereby were not entitled to a house. For these reasons,

shanties totaled approximately 80 percent of all dwellings constructed.

The colonists began to dig wells. Time and time again, the new wells they were

boring came up dry. Only a few wells in the San Elijo flood plain basin and a

few ravines produced any water, and what little water was in them was alkaline

and brackish. The colonists finally realized the awful truth — the land lacked

sufficient water!

This added to a growing cloud of suspicion on Theodore Pinther's honesty and

integrity. Things really heated up once the colonists were told by adjoining

landowners that the $15 per acre they had paid for Rancho Las Encinitas was

an outlandish price for unimproved land and the land was actually only worth a

fraction of that. Rumor circulated that Pinther and Stroebel were receiving a

commission from the sellers, and soon a heated investigation was underway.

Because the original sales contract was written in English, the colonists had

relied on Pinther to translate its content for them. They now demanded a

German translation. Shocked by the contents, a special meeting was quickly

assembled and the contract was read to all members. The contract was such

that the colonists could lose their land, houses, and improvements if for any

reason the remainder of the colony land failed to develop.

The investigation committee met with the Kimball brothers who admitted that

Pinther was to receive a $10,000 commission and a house in National City.

Theodore Pinther was kidnapped by angered colonists and held captive at a

secluded location until he confessed that he had intended to cheat the colonists

from the very beginning. Fearing more attacks on his life he left Colony

Olivenhain forever. Conrad Stroebel denied knowledge of Pinther's deception,

but Colony members believed he had actively participated and he was

"encouraged" to leave.

With Theodore Pinther now gone, the German colonists demanded a new sales

contract from the Kimball brothers. After much haggling and through formal

arbitration, the colonists agreed to purchase 441-7/8 acres at $15 per acre and

the new sales contract was finalized on July 8, 1885. This is now considered

the founding date for Colony Olivenhain.

The damaging effects from all the trouble took its toll on the colony. The size of

the land had been reduced to one tenth of its original size, so could now

accommodate only a few more members. The colonists had lost faith in the

organization and considered it was more trouble than it was worth. Soon, a few

members began to leave the colony, and before long, more than 80% of the

colonists had abandoned their land.

Some colonists, including the Wiegands, Bumanns, Resecks, and Koehns,

homesteaded land to the northeast of the colony land.

Although physically removed, the homesteaders were within a short distance of

the colony and remained socially involved with the remaining colonists. Reseck

Ranch was homesteaded near the termination of Lone Jack Road. After Bernard

Reseck sold the homestead in 1909, the ranch was renamed Lone Jack Ranch.

Since the only destination of the road at the time was the Lone Jack Ranch, it

became known as Lone Jack Road.

By January, 1887, most of the colony farms were abandoned. By mid 1887, the

population stabilized at about 80 people, and in December, 1887, the mortgage

on the colony land was paid. Once the remaining colonists obtained warrant

deeds for their land, dependence on and commitment to the colony system

began to decline. The number of Colony meetings declined down to one or two

a year, with the final meeting on November 15, 1897. No later reference to the

organization called Colony Olivenhain is found.

The Community of Olivenhain

The abolishment of the colony does not imply that Olivenhain history ended. A

healthier and more permanent community evolved. Day to day life was typical

of a farming community. Over time, there were five stores, three blacksmith

shops, two schools, and two meeting halls to supplement the stable farming

community.

The first school was opened in Theodore Pinther's abandoned house in 1886. A

larger one-room school house was opened in 1888 which was used as a school

for 54 years. The standard education included up through eighth grade.

Student who wanted a high school diploma completed their education in

Oceanside or San Diego.

From 1889 to 1935 the enrollment at the Olivenhain School averaged twenty

students. Then in the late 1930's the number of students sharply dropped to

nine. The decline continued, the Olivenhain School was closed in the spring of

1942 and the children were transferred to the Encinitas School District.

In 1887, a copper deposit was discovered near the termination of Lone Jack

Road. A mine was developed by the Encinitas Copper Company and sporadically

produced a low grade of copper ore until 1917. The shafts have since been

blasted closed for safety, and evidence of the mine remains primarily in the

street name Copper Crest Drive. At least four open pit clay mines were

profitably worked from the early 1920's to 1940. These mines produced many

tons of clay and shale which was processed into firebrick, stoneware, and

pottery.

Modern conveniences were slow to arrive in Olivenhain. The first rural mail

delivery began in 1910. Telephone services was extended from Encinitas in

1938, and electricity came to Olivenhain in about 1946. The Olivenhain

Municipal Water District was formally established in 1959 and dedicated in

1961, marking the end of reliance on wells and cisterns as the only source of

water. Lone Jack Road was finally paved in the early 1970's.

Many of the people that remained after 1887 would remain a lifetime. Their

descendents would populate and farm the Olivenhain valley until the present

day. The names of some of the original colonists and settlers are recognizable

today in Bumann Road, Cole Ranch Road, Teten Way, and Wiegand Street.

Olivenhain Today & Tomorrow

Thanks to our low-density zoning, there are approximately 1500 homes within

the Community of Olivenhain today. The Encinitas General Plan projects a total

of 1616 homes when available lots have been built.

Wiro Park, Little Oaks Park, and Sun Vista Park are the only developed parks

within Olivenhain. Little Oaks Park on Lone Jack Road is a horse park complete

with picnic tables, parking for horse trailers, and a riding ring. It provides

access to the trails within Olivenhain. Wiro Park is a small community park on

11th Avenue west of Rancho Santa Fe Road. It has picnic tables, barbeque

grills, and a small playground. Sun Vista Park is community park at the

southwest corner of Rancho Santa Fe Road and Avenida La Posta.

Today, the Olivenhain Town Council continues to maintain and preserve the

Meeting Hall property and buildings, but the overall objective of the Town

Council has been expanded to include the community at large:

To continue to protect and preserve the rural atmosphere that we have

inherited from those before us.

General Meetings of the Town Council, open to all residents of Olivenhain, are

held in the Meeting Hall on the first Wednesday of each month. New directors

are elected to the Board of Directors at the Annual Meeting in June. Directors

serve a two year term.

Residents of Olivenhain are invited to join the Town Council. For a small annual

fee, members receive voting rights at the General Meetings and a newsletter

published ten times per year. Additional contributions to the Olivenhain Town

Council are used for maintenance and restoration of the property.

Members of the Town Council organize several annual activities including the

spring Beer and Bratwurst Festival, a Halloween Party in October, and a Holiday

Party in December. A Craft Fair in November is the major fund-raising activity

of the year. The City Watch Task Force monitors activity at the planning and

traffic departments of the City of Encinitas and often speaks on behalf of

Olivenhain during City Council meetings.

Education

Encinitas Union School District

101 S. Rancho Santa Fe Road / Encinitas, CA 92024

(760) 944-4300 / FAX (760) 942-7094

www.eusd.k12.ca.us

Olivenhain Pioneer Elementary School

8000 Calle Acervo / Carlsbad, CA 92009

(760) 943-2000

San Dieguito Union High School District

710 Encinitas Blvd. / Encinitas, CA 92024

Tel: (760) 753-6491 / Fax: (760-635-0591)

Diegueño Middle School

2150 Village Park Way / Encinitas, CA 92024

Phone: (760) 944-1892 / Fax: (760) 944-3717

www.sduhsd.net/dg

La Costa Canyon High School

1 Maverick Way / Carlsbad, CA 92009

Phone: (760) 436-6136 / Fax: (760) 943-3539

http://lc.sduhsd.net

POPULATION AND HOUSING ESTIMATES (2010)

POPULATION AND HOUSING

Jan. 1, 2010

Population 57,018

Household Population 56,462

Group Quarters 556

Persons per Household 2.82

Total

Housing

Occupied

Households

Vacancy

Rate

Housing Units 21,312 20,049 5.9%

Single Family - Detached 11,660 10,983 5.8%

Single Family - Multiple-Unit 5,119 4,823 5.8%

Multi-Family 3,757 3,541 5.7%

Mobile Home and Other 776 702 9.5%

Note: For

Olivenhain

 

Olivenhain (pronounced Oh-LEE-ven-hine) is one of five communities in the City

of Encinitas. Today, Olivenhain stretches from San Elijo Lagoon in the south,

along both sides of Manchester Avenue and Rancho Santa Fe Road, out past

the northern reach of Lone Jack Road.

With winding two-lane roads, rail fences, and trails for horses, bicycles, and

pedestrians, Olivenhain has a rural atmosphere greatly prized by residents. The

"Dark Skies" policy, which limits outdoor lighting, allows us all an unparalleled

view of the evening sky.

In 1986, Olivenhain joined with Cardiff-by-the-Sea, Leucadia, New Encinitas,

and Old Encinitas to incorporate as the City of Encinitas. But our community

with the German name has an interesting history and heritage. Read on to

discover more about Olivenhain past and present.

Rancho Las Encinitas

By the early 1800's, California was a vast, sparsely inhabited territory of

Mexico. Andreas Antonio Ybarra made a formal request to the Mexican

government that he be awarded a land grant of the 4,431 acre rancho called

"Los Encinitos". The land grant was awarded on July 3, 1842. Ybarra

constructed an adobe house on the northeast corner of his rancho where he

and his wife lived for 18 years. In 1848, when California became part of the

United States, Ybarra filed claim with the United State board of Land

Commissions. His claim to the rancho was confirmed and accepted, but the

spelling was changed to "Las Encinitas."

In 1860, Ybarra sold his land to two San Diego merchants, J.R. Mannasse and

Marcus Schiller, for $3,000 (68¢ per acre).

Mannasse and Schiller converted the adobe ranch house into a stage coach

station which serviced the Seeley-Wright Stage Coach Line.

Today, Stage Coach Park in Carlsbad contains the remains of the walls of the

adobe home on the hill above the tennis courts. The remaining wall fragments

have been enclosed to prevent further damage by the environment or vandals.

Mannasse and Schiller encountered financial difficulties and lost the rancho to

foreclosure in 1800. The rancho was sold first to James Courier for $5,000.

Three months later, two brothers, Warren and Frank Kimball purchased the

rancho for $5,225 ($1.18 per acre).

The Kimball brothers owned vast parcels of land in National City, Chula Vista,

and Jamul. They planned to resell the rancho to a "Colony", a homogenous

group of immigrants who would purchase and settle on a large parcel of land.

The Kimball brothers advertised for four years, and in the spring of 1884,

received a response from Theodore Pinther of Denver, Colorado, who was

willing to put together a German Colony.

Colony Olivenhain

The Colony was begun May 21, 1884 with the first seven members — Theodore

Pinther, Joseph Ullrich, Louis Denk, Otto Pinther, Lina Pinther, Johann Bumann,

and Paul Glave. Each member paid an initiation fee, a membership fee, and

monthly dues. A member in good standing would be entitled to a five acre

parcel of cultivated land, a house of moderate size built on their property, and

the use of all colony-owned property such as horse teams, wagons, and fruit

processing machinery.

By June 1, membership had increased to 20 members. In accepting new

members, the colony wanted honest, hard-working people. People of any

nationality would be accepted if they could speak fluent German. Gamblers and

people of questionable character were not tolerated, nor were lawyers,

pawnbrokers, and insurance agents. The name "Olivenhain" which means olive

grove was chosen to name the colony.

In October, 1884, on a trip to San Diego to view different properties for the

Colony of Olivenhain, Theodore Pinther and Conrad Stroebel purchased Rancho

Las Encinitas with the Colony's money, but without their prior approval or

knowledge, for $66,500 ($15 per acre) plus interest.

On October 31, 1884, sixty-seven Olivenhain colonists boarded the train in

Denver and headed west. Food, water and shelter were almost nonexistent for

the newcomers. The only buildings on Rancho Las Encinitas were the adobe

buildings that Ybarra constructed and lived in years earlier. These three

buildings would now house 67 men, women and children until their homes were

built.

Hundreds of acres of brush-covered soil was cleared and plowed, and

construction of homes, roads, and the colony-owned farm began. The official

land distribution began in January, 1885. After a number of parcels had been

distributed, housing construction began.

The standard Colony house was either 16' x 24' or 14' x 28' divided into two or

three rooms. If the colonist wanted a larger house, additional money was paid

to the colony. Besides the standard house, there was also the economy model,

the shanty. The cost of a shanty was considerably less than the standard house

and credit allowances were given to those colonists that requested them.

Shanties were also built for colonists who had not yet paid enough money into

the colony and thereby were not entitled to a house. For these reasons,

shanties totaled approximately 80 percent of all dwellings constructed.

The colonists began to dig wells. Time and time again, the new wells they were

boring came up dry. Only a few wells in the San Elijo flood plain basin and a

few ravines produced any water, and what little water was in them was alkaline

and brackish. The colonists finally realized the awful truth — the land lacked

sufficient water!

This added to a growing cloud of suspicion on Theodore Pinther's honesty and

integrity. Things really heated up once the colonists were told by adjoining

landowners that the $15 per acre they had paid for Rancho Las Encinitas was

an outlandish price for unimproved land and the land was actually only worth a

fraction of that. Rumor circulated that Pinther and Stroebel were receiving a

commission from the sellers, and soon a heated investigation was underway.

Because the original sales contract was written in English, the colonists had

relied on Pinther to translate its content for them. They now demanded a

German translation. Shocked by the contents, a special meeting was quickly

assembled and the contract was read to all members. The contract was such

that the colonists could lose their land, houses, and improvements if for any

reason the remainder of the colony land failed to develop.

The investigation committee met with the Kimball brothers who admitted that

Pinther was to receive a $10,000 commission and a house in National City.

Theodore Pinther was kidnapped by angered colonists and held captive at a

secluded location until he confessed that he had intended to cheat the colonists

from the very beginning. Fearing more attacks on his life he left Colony

Olivenhain forever. Conrad Stroebel denied knowledge of Pinther's deception,

but Colony members believed he had actively participated and he was

"encouraged" to leave.

With Theodore Pinther now gone, the German colonists demanded a new sales

contract from the Kimball brothers. After much haggling and through formal

arbitration, the colonists agreed to purchase 441-7/8 acres at $15 per acre and

the new sales contract was finalized on July 8, 1885. This is now considered

the founding date for Colony Olivenhain.

The damaging effects from all the trouble took its toll on the colony. The size of

the land had been reduced to one tenth of its original size, so could now

accommodate only a few more members. The colonists had lost faith in the

organization and considered it was more trouble than it was worth. Soon, a few

members began to leave the colony, and before long, more than 80% of the

colonists had abandoned their land.

Some colonists, including the Wiegands, Bumanns, Resecks, and Koehns,

homesteaded land to the northeast of the colony land.

Although physically removed, the homesteaders were within a short distance of

the colony and remained socially involved with the remaining colonists. Reseck

Ranch was homesteaded near the termination of Lone Jack Road. After Bernard

Reseck sold the homestead in 1909, the ranch was renamed Lone Jack Ranch.

Since the only destination of the road at the time was the Lone Jack Ranch, it

became known as Lone Jack Road.

By January, 1887, most of the colony farms were abandoned. By mid 1887, the

population stabilized at about 80 people, and in December, 1887, the mortgage

on the colony land was paid. Once the remaining colonists obtained warrant

deeds for their land, dependence on and commitment to the colony system

began to decline. The number of Colony meetings declined down to one or two

a year, with the final meeting on November 15, 1897. No later reference to the

organization called Colony Olivenhain is found.

The Community of Olivenhain

The abolishment of the colony does not imply that Olivenhain history ended. A

healthier and more permanent community evolved. Day to day life was typical

of a farming community. Over time, there were five stores, three blacksmith

shops, two schools, and two meeting halls to supplement the stable farming

community.

The first school was opened in Theodore Pinther's abandoned house in 1886. A

larger one-room school house was opened in 1888 which was used as a school

for 54 years. The standard education included up through eighth grade.

Student who wanted a high school diploma completed their education in

Oceanside or San Diego.

From 1889 to 1935 the enrollment at the Olivenhain School averaged twenty

students. Then in the late 1930's the number of students sharply dropped to

nine. The decline continued, the Olivenhain School was closed in the spring of

1942 and the children were transferred to the Encinitas School District.

In 1887, a copper deposit was discovered near the termination of Lone Jack

Road. A mine was developed by the Encinitas Copper Company and sporadically

produced a low grade of copper ore until 1917. The shafts have since been

blasted closed for safety, and evidence of the mine remains primarily in the

street name Copper Crest Drive. At least four open pit clay mines were

profitably worked from the early 1920's to 1940. These mines produced many

tons of clay and shale which was processed into firebrick, stoneware, and

pottery.

Modern conveniences were slow to arrive in Olivenhain. The first rural mail

delivery began in 1910. Telephone services was extended from Encinitas in

1938, and electricity came to Olivenhain in about 1946. The Olivenhain

Municipal Water District was formally established in 1959 and dedicated in

1961, marking the end of reliance on wells and cisterns as the only source of

water. Lone Jack Road was finally paved in the early 1970's.

Many of the people that remained after 1887 would remain a lifetime. Their

descendents would populate and farm the Olivenhain valley until the present

day. The names of some of the original colonists and settlers are recognizable

today in Bumann Road, Cole Ranch Road, Teten Way, and Wiegand Street.

Olivenhain Today & Tomorrow

Thanks to our low-density zoning, there are approximately 1500 homes within

the Community of Olivenhain today. The Encinitas General Plan projects a total

of 1616 homes when available lots have been built.

Wiro Park, Little Oaks Park, and Sun Vista Park are the only developed parks

within Olivenhain. Little Oaks Park on Lone Jack Road is a horse park complete

with picnic tables, parking for horse trailers, and a riding ring. It provides

access to the trails within Olivenhain. Wiro Park is a small community park on

11th Avenue west of Rancho Santa Fe Road. It has picnic tables, barbeque

grills, and a small playground. Sun Vista Park is community park at the

southwest corner of Rancho Santa Fe Road and Avenida La Posta.

Today, the Olivenhain Town Council continues to maintain and preserve the

Meeting Hall property and buildings, but the overall objective of the Town

Council has been expanded to include the community at large:

To continue to protect and preserve the rural atmosphere that we have

inherited from those before us.

General Meetings of the Town Council, open to all residents of Olivenhain, are

held in the Meeting Hall on the first Wednesday of each month. New directors

are elected to the Board of Directors at the Annual Meeting in June. Directors

serve a two year term.

Residents of Olivenhain are invited to join the Town Council. For a small annual

fee, members receive voting rights at the General Meetings and a newsletter

published ten times per year. Additional contributions to the Olivenhain Town

Council are used for maintenance and restoration of the property.

Members of the Town Council organize several annual activities including the

spring Beer and Bratwurst Festival, a Halloween Party in October, and a Holiday

Party in December. A Craft Fair in November is the major fund-raising activity

of the year. The City Watch Task Force monitors activity at the planning and

traffic departments of the City of Encinitas and often speaks on behalf of

Olivenhain during City Council meetings.

Education

Encinitas Union School District

101 S. Rancho Santa Fe Road / Encinitas, CA 92024

(760) 944-4300 / FAX (760) 942-7094

www.eusd.k12.ca.us

Olivenhain Pioneer Elementary School

8000 Calle Acervo / Carlsbad, CA 92009

(760) 943-2000

San Dieguito Union High School District

710 Encinitas Blvd. / Encinitas, CA 92024

Tel: (760) 753-6491 / Fax: (760-635-0591)

Diegueño Middle School

2150 Village Park Way / Encinitas, CA 92024

Phone: (760) 944-1892 / Fax: (760) 944-3717

www.sduhsd.net/dg

La Costa Canyon High School

1 Maverick Way / Carlsbad, CA 92009

Phone: (760) 436-6136 / Fax: (760) 943-3539

http://lc.sduhsd.net

POPULATION AND HOUSING ESTIMATES (2010)

POPULATION AND HOUSING

Jan. 1, 2010

Population 57,018

Household Population 56,462

Group Quarters 556

Persons per Household 2.82

Total

Housing

Occupied

Households

Vacancy

Rate

Housing Units 21,312 20,049 5.9%

Single Family - Detached 11,660 10,983 5.8%

Single Family - Multiple-Unit 5,119 4,823 5.8%

Multi-Family 3,757 3,541 5.7%

Mobile Home and Other 776 702 9.5%